Employment and Training (Post 16)

Employment is a very important part of life. When people have a job, they feel part of society, they have a purpose, make new friends plus have money in their pockets to buy the things they want.

There are a number of ways that young people with special educational needs and disabilities can access the world of work.  These include:

  • Supported Internships
  • Apprenticeships
  • Traineeships
  • Volunteering
Access to Work

Young people who wish to move straight into employment can access funding for Job Coaching and other reasonable adjustments through DWP Access To Work funding.

Download an easy read guide on access to work 

There are also specialist DWP Work Coaches who can support job searching.

 

Supported Internships

Supported Internships are an employment-based education programme which helps the transition to employment for young people with Education, Health and Care Plans who have completed their education journey.  An internship is a programme that lasts from 6 months to one year.  Learners receive support from a job coach to help them learn required job tasks. 

Apprenticeships

What is an apprenticeship?

Apprenticeships are a great way to:

  • learn on the job
  • build up knowledge and skills
  • gain qualifications and earn money at the same time.

Into Apprenticeships  - A Guide For Disabled People.  Produced by Disability Rights UK 'Into Apprenticeships' is a guide for disabled people, parents and key advisers about applying for apprenticeships in England. It deals with common questions such as how to find an apprenticeship, whether the training will be accessible and what support is available in the workplace.

Applying for an Apprenticeship.  Most apprenticeships will be listed on the Apprenticeship website where you can register and set up alerts.

Traineeships

These are designed to prepare students for a future career, by helping them to get ready for the world of work and improving their chances of getting an Apprenticeship or other job. They last anything from six weeks to a maximum of six months.

Find your Future Careers portal has more information.

Volunteering

Volunteering can help provide you with valuable experience, in lots of different ways such as:

  • you can gain new skills
  • you can meet new people and make friends whilst doing something you are interested in
  • you can build self-esteem and confidence and have a feeling of achievement knowing you have given something back
  • you can help your own community to grow and develop. Volunteering gives you a chance to give back to your community by sharing your own skills and knowledge

Volunteering is a great way to bridge gaps in your CV and also gives you a recent reference for employers to contact

You will find lots of useful information about volunteering, on our Find Your Future Careers Portal.

Financial support

Employment Support Allowance (ESA) is an allowance provided by the government which offers help if you have a disability or health condition that affects how much you can work. The ‘New Style’ ESA has replaced the ‘contribution-based’ ESA. You can find out more about whether you are eligible on the Government website.

Access to work, provides support and could include money, known as a grant, which you don’t have to pay back. It helps people who have a disability or long-term health condition to do their job.